Medical Modelling, Second Edition: The Application of Advanced Design and Rapid Prototyping Techniques in Medicine (Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials)

Medical modelling and the principles of medical imaging, Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Rapid Prototyping (also known as Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing) are important techniques relating to various disciplines – from biomaterials engineering to surgery. Building on the success of the first edition, Medical Modelling: The application of Advanced Design and Rapid Prototyping techniques in medicine provides readers with a revised edition of the original text, along with key information on innovative imaging techniques, Rapid Prototyping technologies and case studies. Following an overview of medical imaging for Rapid Prototyping, the book goes on to discuss working with medical scan data and techniques for Rapid Prototyping. In this second edition there is an extensive section of peer-reviewed case studies, describing the practical applications of advanced design technologies in surgical, prosthetic, orthotic, dental and research applications. * Covers the steps towards rapid prototyping, from conception (modelling) to manufacture (manufacture)* Includes a comprehensive case studies section on the practical application of computer-aided design (CAD) and rapid prototyping (RP)* Provides an insight into medical imaging for rapid prototyping and working with medical scan data

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Chinese Reportedly Use 3D Printing to Triumph the Most Advanced US Fighter Jet

Going back thousands of years, technology has played a major role in the defense of a nations and territories. From the Romans using hydraulic cement or concrete 2,500 years ago to fortify their cities from attack, to precision satellite guided weapons used in Iraq and Afghanistan today by the U.S. military, technology is almost as important as the actual strategies used behind any offensive or defensive maneuver.

An F-22 Raptor flies over Kadena Air Base, Japan

An F-22 Raptor flies over Kadena Air Base, Japan

The two super powers in the world today, could be said to be the United States and China. Although both countries have somewhat friendly relations, that doesn’t mean a power struggle has not erupted between the two nations over the last decade or two. The United States is known for their superior air power, with extremely advanced aircraft, such as the F-22 Raptor, and the B-2 stealth bomber, among others. In fact, the F-22 Raptor is considered the most technologically advanced aircraft in the world.

China, obviously isn’t happy with such a claim, so they have set out to create their own advanced fighter jets, in an attempt to be able to control the Asian Pacific sky in the event of a conflict. Recently unveiled earlier this year, the J-25 ‘Ghost Bird’ is claimed by the Chinese military to have the capability to shoot down any aircraft in the United States’ arsenal within second. This includes the F-22 Raptor. Of course, such a claim can not be verified at this time, and military technology remains quite secretive.

The J-25 'Ghost Bird'

The J-25 ‘Ghost Bird’

A recent report out of China indicates that the J-25′s superiority over the F-22 Raptor has a lot to do with the 3D printing technology used within the production of the advanced fighter jet. The J-25 is reportedly faster, and has greater undectability than that of the United States fighter. The aircraft, produced by the Chengdu Aviation Corporation, reportedly uses 3D printing for several key parts, leading to a lighter weight, while remaining extremely j-25-2durable and strong. The ability to hide from enemy radar, while remaining extremely agile to maneuver, can also reportedly be credited, at least in part, to 3D printing.  The aircraft weighs approximately 20 tons, and it is said that additive manufacturing was used to make at least part of the fuselage.

Although it may be years before knowing the extend of the technology used within these Chinese fighter jets, such a plane is a key reason why government funding of new technologies, like that of additive manufacturing, is so very important. Such funding could lead to advances which will eventually make their way into the private sector of the economy. Whether the J-25 and its 3D printed components could outfight the F-22, we hopefully will never know, but if these reports do anything, it will likely push the U.S. into even more research into additive manufacturing technologies.

Let’s hear your opinion on the J-25 fighter jet, and its uses of additive manufacturing to possibly out maneuver the pride of the United States Airforce, the F-22, in the Chinese Fighter Jet forum thread on 3DPB.com.

[Source: 3dFocus]

GE to Add New Advanced Manufacturing Works Facility Featuring Additive Manufacturing

geAs advancements continue in 3D printing, particularly that of laser sintering, we are seeing major investments within the aerospace industries, as well as several other areas which rely on highly detailed, light weight, customized parts. This week Global conglomerate General Electric Co. announced plans to add a technology center to its manufacturing and engineering complex in Greenville, S.C.

The new facility, which will be known as the Advanced Manufacturing Works, is slated to open in 2015. The first-of-its-kind center will employ a variety of technologies including additive manufacturing using lasers and electron beams, five-axis machining, automated welding and advanced composites.

The company plans to use it to develop high-tech manufacturing processes across its largest industrial business unit, its Power and Water unit. The new technology center will develop prototypes and processes for a host of other GE businesses including its heavy-duty gas turbine, wind turbine, gas engine, nuclear power services and water purification businesses.

According to GE, the center will allow the company to do things better and faster.

leap-engine-additive-fuel-nozzle

“Greenville serves as the ideal location for the Power and Water advanced manufacturing site. Here we will be able to deliver even more innovative breakthrough products and services, work better with each other and our customers, and bring best-in-class technologies to market quicker,” GE Power and Water President and CEO Steve Bolze said.

Kurt Goodwin, the GE executive who will manage the new center in Greenville, said the new project may help create jobs in Greenville in emerging markets. An example Goodwin gave of potential jobs revolved around the prototype parts the company plans to make at the center from metal powder.

“So somebody’s going to have to come up with equipment to transport the powder around the shop, whether it’s some kind of ducting or conveyor system or something,” Goodwin said. “That’s not probably going to be our core focus.”

GE plans to spend $400 million on the new center over the next 10 years. Seventy-three million dollars will go towards building the new center and hiring 80 new high tech employees, while the remaining $327 million will go towards machinery and equipment. The hefty price tag allows GE to receive a “super FILO,” a tax cut that cuts the assessment ratio from 10.5 percent to 4 percent and can last up to 40 years.

The new center will be just a state away from GE Aviation in Asheville, N.C. the hub that makes components for the Leap engine. Some of very complicated parts like the Leap engine fuel nozzle, are being manufactured using additive manufacturing processes.  Check out the brief video below showing off some of the 3D printing which takes place at their current facility.

Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare's futuristic weapons include 3D printer gun