Printrbot Simple 2014 3D Printer Kit, PLA Filament, 1.75mm Ubis Hot End, 4″ x 4″ x 4″ Build Volume

The Printrbot Simple 2014 3D printer kit has an open platform with an aluminum print bed and a frame constructed of machined aluminum and laser-cut birch wood for fabricating objects to maximum dimensions of 4 x 4 x 4 inches/100 x 100 x 100 mm (H x W x D) using PLA (polylactic acid) thermoplastic filament. The printer, which requires assembly, has a vertical resolution of 100 microns (0.10 mm) and includes a direct drive 6061 aluminum extruder with a shrouded cooling fan and an Ubis hot end that accepts 1.75 mm PLA filament. The unheated 6061 aluminum print bed has a matte finish and provides a level build surface that will not warp. The printer is commanded through the provided micro USB cable using G-code numerical control instructions. An SD memory card slot can store G-code instructions on a memory card (sold separately) for operation without a connection to a computer. It can be used with 3D printer management software packages (sold separately). The frame is made of laser-cut birch wood. Machined aluminum axis rods with linear bearings and injection molded gears help ensure precise movement. The size 17 stepper motors meet the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standard ICS 16-2001. The printer comes with a sample spool of PLA filament.

Specifications
Printing material PLA
Vertical (Z-axis) resolution 100 microns (0.10 mm)
Hot end Ubis 1.75 mm
Nozzle diameter 0.4 mm
Build speed 60-65 mm/min
Build volume 4 x 4 x 4 inches/100 x 100 x 100 mm (H x W x D)
Overall dimensions 8 x 14 x 11 inches (H x W x D)
Weight 5.25 lb (2.38 kg)
Input format G-code
Input method Micro USB cable (included) or SD memory card (sold separately)

*H is height, the vertical distance from the lowest to highest point; W is width, the horizontal distance from left to right; D is depth, the horizontal distance from front to back.

3D printers fabricate physical objects directly from computer-aided-design (CAD) data sources. Objects created by additive manufacturing are built by dispensing successive thin layers of molten material onto a moving platform base from a robotic extruder nozzle. The material is most commonly a thermoplastic or HDPE (high-density polyethylene) filament.

Printrbot manufactures desktop 3D printers and accessories. The company is headquartered in Lincoln, CA.

What’s in the Box?

  • Printrbot Simple 2014 3D Printer Kit (unassembled)
  • Assorted fasteners for assembly
  • 12v 6A laptop style power supply
  • Power cord
  • USB cable
  • Sample spool of 1.75 mm PLA plastic filament

Product Features

  • Kit for 3D printer that fabricates objects from G-code instructions using PLA thermoplastic filament
  • Open platform for ease of access with machined aluminum and laser-cut birch wood frame construction and an aluminum alloy print bed
  • Builds objects to maximum dimensions of 4 x 4 x 4 inches/102 x 102 x 102 mm (H x W x D)
  • Vertical (Z-axis) resolution of 100 microns (0.10 mm)
  • 6061 aluminum print bed provides a level build surface that will not warp

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3D Printing: Build Your Own 3D Printer and Print Your Own 3D Objects

This lush, 4-color book uses a straightforward, photo and screenshot-rich design to teach the reader everything he/she needs to know about 3D printing technology. 3D printing can be intimidating to many people. The machines are getting simpler, but there’s still a software and hardware component that can be overwhelming to people not familiar with them. 3D printing doesn’t have to be difficult to understand or use – and this book will provide super-simple explanations and instructions that other books on the subject are missing. New 3DP owners don’t want to spend a lot of time reading about how the technology works. 

 

This book touches on that, but gets right to the heart of the matter and shows readers how 3D printing isn’t sci-fi and it isn’t only for the geeks. It tackles and simplifies topics such as CAD, XYZ coordinate system, and STL files, and teaches readers how to brainstorm a 3D object, how to design it with AutoCAD software, and ultimately how to print it on a printer the reader built him or herself!

 

This book provides sidebars with useful websites that outline cool and interesting projects/devices. This book uses as little non-technical jargon as possible, and focuses on easy-to-understand explanations for topics such as XYZ coordinates, CAD (Computer Aided Design), and STL files. Many people still believe that 3D printing is the province of the uber nerdy, but we’re here to show that readers young and old will understand just how easy it is to build a 3D printer, connect it to a computer, design a 3D object with simple (and free) software, and then print that object in plastic.

 

Purchasers of the book will also receive access to a series of short streaming web videos that demonstrate many of the software techniques used in the book as well as some videos of the 3D printer assembly and use.

 

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Build Your Own CNC Machine (Technology in Action)

Do you like to build things? Are you ever frustrated at having to compromise your designs to fit whatever parts happen to be available? Would you like to fabricate your own parts? Build Your Own CNC Machine is the book to get you started. CNC expert Patrick Hood-Daniel and best-selling author James Kelly team up to show you how to construct your very own CNC machine. Then they go on to show you how to use it, how to document your designs in computer-aided design (CAD) programs, and how to output your designs as specifications and tool paths that feed into the CNC machine, controlling it as it builds whatever parts your imagination can dream up.

Don’t be intimidated by abbreviations like CNC and terms like computer-aided design. Patrick and James have chosen a CNC-machine design that is simple to fabricate. You need only basic woodworking skills and a budget of perhaps $500 to $1,000 to spend on the wood, a router, and various other parts that you’ll need. With some patience and some follow-through, you’ll soon be up and running with a really fun machine that’ll unleash your creativity and turn your imagination into physical reality.

  • The authors go on to show you how to test your machine, including configuring the software.
  • Provides links for learning how to design and mill whatever you can dream up
  • The perfect parent/child project that is also suitable for scouting groups, clubs, school shop classes, and other organizations that benefit from projects that foster skills development and teamwork
  • No unusual tools needed beyond a circular saw and what you likely already have in your home toolbox
  • Teaches you to design and mill your very own wooden and aluminum parts, toys, gadgets—whatever you can dream up

What you’ll learn

  • Build your very own CNC machine
  • Learn about linear movement and motion transmission

Who this book is for

Build Your Own CNC Machine is the perfect book for hobbyists who like to build and create using wood and metal. It’s especially for those who have ever been foiled by lack of specific parts to help realize their creative designs. Build Your Own CNC Machine is also an excellent choice for organizations such as scouting and church groups, school shop classes, and so forth, as it provides an educational project of modest cost that all can work on together.

Table of Contents

  1. Your CNC Machine
  2. Hardware and Tools
  3. Tips and Advice
  4. Movement Using Rails
  5. Joining Methods
  6. The Electronics
  7. X-Axis, Part 1
  8. X-Axis, Part 2
  9. X-Axis, Part 3
  10. Y-Axis, Part 1
  11. Y-Axis, Part 2
  12. Y-Axis, Part 3
  13. Preparing for the Z-Axis
  14. Z-Axis, Part 1
  15. Z-Axis, Part 2
  16. Z-Axis, Part 3
  17. Mounting the Electronics
  18. Software and Testing
  19. Where to Go from Here

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Printing in Plastic: Build Your Own 3D Printer (Technology in Action)

Printing in Plastic: Build Your Own 3D Printer is your gateway into the exciting world of personal fabrication. The “printer” that you’ll build from this book is a personal fabricator capable of creating small parts and other objects from drops of molten plastic. Design a part using a modeling tool such as Google SketchUp. Then, watch while the fabricator head sweeps back and forth and upwards, depositing plastic in all the right places. You can build anything from a replacement tab to hold a bookshelf in place, to a small art project, to a bashguard for your bicycle. If you can conceive it and design it, you can build it, and you’ll have fun doing it!

Printing in Plastic is aimed at creative people comfortable using power tools such as a table saw, circular saw, and drill press. Authors James Kelly and Patrick Hood-Daniel lead you through building a personal fabrication machine based upon a set of blueprints downloaded from their website. Example projects get you started in designing and fabricating your own parts. Bring your handyman skills, and apply patience during the build process. You too can be the proud owner of a personal fabricator—a three-dimensional printer.

  • Leads you through building a personal fabrication machine capable of creating small parts and objects from plastic
  • Provides example projects to get you started on the road to designing and fabricating your own parts
  • Provides an excellent parent/child, or small group project

What you’ll learn

  • How to assemble your own 3D printer
  • The ins and outs of design software
  • How to design and produce three-dimensional parts made from plastic
  • How to replace small plastic parts in household objects
  • How to create art objects

Who this book is for

Printing in Plastic is aimed at creative people comfortable using power tools, such as a table saw, circular saw, drill press, and so forth. The book is aimed at those who want to create and fabricate tangible objects from plastic. Crafters, carpenters, electronics hobbyists, and others comfortable working with their hands will find the instructions easy to follow and the projects rewarding.

Table of Contents

  1. What to Expect
  2. Hardware and Tools
  3. Tips & Advice
  4. Cutting the Parts I
  5. Cutting the Parts II
  6. Advanced Cuts and Drilling I
  7. Advanced Cuts and Drilling II
  8. Advanced Cuts and Drilling III
  9. Advanced Cuts and Drilling IV
  10. Beginning Assembly
  11. Sub-Assembly Work
  12. Adding Structure
  13. Motors and Movement
  14. The Extruder
  15. The Filament Feeding Mechanism
  16. Mounting Electronics
  17. Final Assembly Check
  18. Software I
  19. Software II
  20. Trial Run I
  21. Trial Run II
  22. Self-Replication
  23. Troubleshooting

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