PLA Gold Filament 1.75mm, 1kg / 2.2lb Printing Material Supply Spool for 3D Printer

These 3D Filament roll in a spool wheel comes in many various colors and in different materials (ie such as ABS or PLA, etc). This is a durable material designed for strong, resilient parts. When printed, this 1.75 mm high temperature filament diameter will look good and have slightly more texture than standard filament.

PLA can be composted at commercial facilities unlike ABS which is derived from fossil fuels. PLA is a more earth friendly plastic. It is stronger and more rigid than ABS, and in general the printed objects will have a more glossy look and feel compared to ABS. Unlike ABS, PLA can be sanded and machined. PLA has a lower melting temperature compared to ABS. As a material, PLA has much less warping versus ABS. Additionally, a heated bed is not required to print it. PLA generally enjoys sharper details and corners compared to ABS without the risk of cracking or warping. PLA can also be printed at higher throughput speeds.

Compatible with Flashforge, RepRap, Makerbot, UP!, Lulzbot, Afinia, Solidoodle, MakerGear, Printrbot LC, and more!

Product Features

  • Diameter of the filament: 1.75mm; Weight of the Filament spool: 1KG/2.2lbs
  • Printing at user control melting temperature at between 160 – 180 C
  • Easy to use and performs well on most prints
  • High Product Precision: Filament extrudes precisely for excellent printing and consistent layering.
  • Spool of the Filament are in a sealed package

Check Out Our Website For Details…

3D Printing Your Heart of Gold via a CT Scan

It’s probably not quite what Neil Young had in mind, but Canadian artist Brendon McNaughton has a heart of gold. Or at least, after seeing the possibilities for 3D printing available at Objex Unlimited 3D Printing Studio, he wants to print one.

Heart-of-Gold-FrontMcNaughton’s idea is that clients would commission him to create an artistic heart from a CT scan of their actual living, breathing organ. Each heart would then be covered in 22 Carat gold and be larger than life. This is the ultimate in the personalization that we have seen offered through the medium of 3D printing.

To create these custom printed hearts, McNaughton uses Objex’s ProJet 6000 Stereolithography printer. The precision of this particular machine allows for a high level of detail all while maintaining a smooth surface finish. The final object is then also able to withstand the further handling as the gold leaf is applied.

In a time when everything is being mass-produced and the choices for consumer are from among a sea of monotonous similarities, there is a nearly desperate search for the individual and the authentic. In this object there is what McNaughton is calling “a portrait of contemporary market oriented cultures.” There is nothing to this work other than its very availability for purchase. That isn’t to say that there isn’t any artistry to the creation, but rather that its reason for existence in any particular form is the result of a desire to purchase yet another image of self.

In this piece, there is a meeting of two somewhat miraculous machines. The one, the engine of survival for the human body, the other creating form out of seemingly thin air. Despite the in depth understanding of the technologies of both, neither have lost their appeal and they both represent nearly everything that can be said about humankind.

Screen Shot 2014-12-24 at 3.40.11 PMThe heart, symbolic seat of love, kindness, compassion, friendship, and faith here meets a creation of the rational mind and is, in fact, actually produced by this rational creation. The desire to own such a piece? Well, something from the heart, most likely. The symbolism can get as thick as you’d like it.

McNaughton’s previous work has allowed him to explore the ideas of class and status and this piece is no different. If one human is simply the same as another, how can we justify the incredible economic distinctions made among them? Do those who have the ability to spend money on a portrait of their heart actually have hearts worthy of such a creation? In an age of incomplete Nihilism, the idea of purchasing such an object while others starve might cause a pang in the breasts of those whose hearts are more metaphorically made of gold.

Isn’t this all just a tad narcissistic?

Well, of course – but really that’s part of the point. It’s a post-modern point, though, in that the person purchasing the heart might not have gotten the joke, but that doesn’t mean that the artist isn’t laughing. Would you consider having your heart printed in gold?  Let’s hear your thoughts about these creations.  Discuss in the 3D Printed Heart of Gold forum thread on 3DPB.com.

Spin Your 3D Printed Object into Gold, and More, With Orbit 1

monolith studioWhen something new and fantastical like 3D printing comes along and starts gaining steam, soon after it’s common for many accessories and peripheral devices to follow on its coattails. While that does seem to be the intent of Monolith Studio’s Orbit 1, the metal plating device they have developed and just shown off at Maker Faire 2014 in NYC, seems to encompass a whole world of its own, demonstrating surprising versatility.

Metal 3D printers generally cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and are used in more professional atmospheres where the big budgets reign. While 3D printing in metal is on the upswing with more and more metal 3D printing devices being sold, you still probably aren’t going to see them in many private homes any time soon, which means the 3D printing enthusiasts without the big bucks will have to work around that. And getting creative is what 3D printing is all about to begin with.

The Orbit 1, coming to market soon, will cater to the wallet size of the hobbyist, with devices costing under $5,000. The device acts sort of like a dunking tank for your 3D product, where you can coat it in the metal of your choice. With current options of nickel, copper, lead, and gold, the product is coated with the choice metal and then dipped into the Orbit 1, hanging from a hook on the lid, after which it is rotated in metal liquid and chemicals.

An app is also supplied for controlling the process on two different settings whether you prefer simple or advanced, as well as offering alerts for when to change the solution. Multi-tasking in another popular 3D printing arena as well, the metal solution can also be used to make electronics, due to the properties of nickel, copper and gold, which are excellent conductors of electricity. 3D printed electronics are a fast-growing area of interest in the industry as of late, and the Orbit 1 might prove to be one possible solution.

The Orbit 1, on display in NYC at Maker Faire 2014

The Orbit 1, on display in NYC at Maker Faire 2014

Aside from being a great, cost-efficient idea, the Orbit 1 just looks like it would be fun to use. With the advent of the desktop 3D printer and the industry’s progression into one-stop-shop manufacturing–rather than just being limited to printing of samples and prototypes–accessories, embellishments, and yes, coatings are sure to be very popular in the future. From decoupage to adornments, to dunking your 3D printed goodies in metal solutions, it’s only the beginning in terms of the testing and experimenting with the limits of this medium.

The Orbit 1 ‘Go-Plating’ finish should work on just about any material, which means you might find plenty of items to turn into metal. This apparatus is a versatile invention all on its own, with a great deal of obvious potential. While it should sell for $3,000 to $4,000, expect to see this product on Kickstarter in early 2015. Is this a product you are interesting in trying? What implications could it have on the 3D printing space in general? Let’s hear your thoughts in the Orbit 1 forum thread at 3DPB.com.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGNkjawvHGM]

[Source: TomsGuide]

NinjaFlex Announces New Website Along With Flexible Silver And Gold 3D Printer Filaments

ninjaflexlogoWhen it comes to flexible, rubbery, durable 3D printer filaments, there are two companies that lead the industry. They are Fenner Drives, with their NinjaFlex filament, along with their competitor Recreus, with their FilaFlex filament. Both companies make very high quality products that I have experienced firsthand.

This week, the folks at Fenner Drives have informed 3DPrint.com that they have launched a new website, specifically devoted to their flexible NinjaFlex filaments. Along with the release of this new website, the company has also announced two new flexible metallic colored filaments.

ninjaflex1

As of now, you can purchase a flexible metallic silver NinjaFlex filament, and next month a metallic gold will become available as well. Both will be priced the same as the other 9 flexible colors that have previously been available (Snow, Fire, Midnight, Sapphire, Lava, Flamingo, Grass, Sun and Water). Those prices are $51.99 for the 1.75mm version and $64.99 for the 3mm option.

NinjaFlex Silver - Available now!

NinjaFlex Silver – Available now!

“After the success of the colors introduced last February, we are even more excited to see what the new metallic colors will inspire our customers to create,” said Erica Fingar, NinjaFlex product manager.

As for the website, it launches with several interactive and educational features. It will provide detailed technical specifications of their filament offerings, project ideas and examples of the creative ways in which their flexible filaments can be used, as well as case studies on how NinjaFlex’s unique properties have created exceptional 3D printed objects. Also there is a forum for customers to talk with other NinjaFlex users and learn what the best methods of use are.

“We wanted to provide our customers with the depth of technical information their projects require as well as tips on achieving optimal prints with NinjaFlex,” Fingar said. “Our new site will provide those helpful resources as well as a platform for sharing ideas and insights.”

NinjaFlex filament has been used for a lot of creative, unique projects and ideas over the past year alone. It’s been used to create copper etched circuit boards, to make a shoe designer’s ideas come to life, make bogus Apple iWatches, and even help a duck walk again.

What do you think about the introduction of these two new metallic NinjaFlex colors, and how do you like their new website? Discuss on the NinjaFlex Announcement forum thread on 3DPB.com.