IC3D 3mm PLA 3D Printer Filament 2lb Black – MADE IN USA

IC3D® – For 3D Printers, By 3D Printers (TM) Spend more time printing with high-quality 3D printer filament from IC3D®. IC3D® extrudes 3D printer filament in-house in Ohio, USA. Strict production standards for cleanliness and tolerance specifications ensure the diameter is within +/- 0.10mm and ovality (roundness) is within 4%. Quality is the top priority as each spool is hand checked, vacuum sealed with desiccant, and packaged. IC3D® filament is extensively tested with success on a variety of mainstream desktop 3D printers utilizing various extruder designs and hot-end styles. Every spool of IC3D® filament is backed by a 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEE.

Product Features

  • 2lb of 3mm PLA 3D printer filament
  • Filament diameter is 2.90mm +/-0.10, ovality (roundness) is within 4% and weight is 2.1lb +/- 0.1
  • Printing temperature range is 190 – 200C
  • Made in the USA under strict quality standards
  • Compatible with the following 3D printers (with heated beds): Reprap, Afinia, MakerBot, PrintrBot, UltiMaker, Airwolf, Makergear, Up!, Lulzbot, Flashforge, Solidoodle, 3doodler (pen), Delta, Mbot, Type A

Check Out Our Website For Details…

First Ever Functioning 3D Printed Object Has Been Fabricated in Space by NASA & Made In Space

madeinspace5One of the more fascinating applications for 3D printing is the fabrication of object in Space. NASA, as well as the European Space Industry, and several private companies, are working diligently on methods, applications, and technologies to enable 3D printing outside of the earth’s atmosphere.

NASA, along with Mountain View-based Made In Space, are seemingly at the forefront of all this research. Back in September NASA launched the very first Zero­G 3D Printer into space, with its destination being the International Space Station. With the launch, marked a turning point in space travel, one which could take us to distant planets like Mars without the need for numerous supply missions. With a Zero­G 3D Printer on board, astronauts could theoretically, in the future, print most of what they need during a mission.

“When the first human fashioned a tool from a rock, it couldn’t have been conceived that one day we’d be replicating the same fundamental idea in space,” said Aaron Kemmer, CEO of Made In Space, Inc. “We look at the operation of the 3D printer as a transformative moment, not just for space development, but for the capability of our species to live away from Earth.”

madeinspace3

Before getting ahead of ourselves, however, researchers first need to be able to print small plastic parts in order to learn more about the process of 3D printing in an environment with microgravity . After more than two months in space, the madeinspace4printer finally was able to fabricate its very first object, a faceplate for its own extruder, with the words ‘Made In Space” printed into it. The faceplate will serve as an access panel to the print head and is an actual functioning part. Such a part is a fantastic example of how astronauts can print custom components, as needed, without the burden of having to bring numerous supplies to space, which likely would never be used.

“This project demonstrates the basic fundamentals of useful manufacturing in space. The results of this experiment will serve as a stepping stone for significant future capabilities that will allow for the reduction of spare parts and mass on a spacecraft, which will change exploration mission architectures for the better,” said Mike Snyder, Director of R&D for Made In Space and Principal Investigator for this experiment. “Manufacturing components on demand will yield more efficient, more reliable, and less Earth dependent space programs in the near future.”madeinspace7

Made in Space, with the help of NASA, has certainly taken a huge step towards the future of space travel and manufacturing. Additional parts will be printed on the Zero­G 3D Printer, which will then be sent back to Earth. Here, researchers will analyze various aspects of the objects, including flexibility, tensile strength, and torque. Made In Space can then take this information and use it to improve upon a second printer which they are working on, scheduled to be launched early next year. While the second printer will be used to create objects for both NASA and Made in Space, to further their research and development, it will also be available to businesses who wish to rent time in order to fabricate objects such as small satellites.

“In 1957, Sputnik became the first man-made object in space and, 12 years later, that led to humans setting foot on the moon,” said Kemmer. “Now, in 2014, we’ve taken another significant step forward – we’ve started operating a machine that will lead us to continual manufacturing in space. Decades from now, people will look back to this event…it will be seen as the moment when the paradigm of how we get hardware to space changed.”

What will this first print and subsequent analysis of it lead to? It’s anyone’s guess at this point. However, with the team at Made In Space combining their talents with the world’s most advanced space agency, NASA, the Sky is no longer the limit. Let’s hear your thoughts on one of the most incredible 3D prints we have seen yet. Discuss in the Made in Space forum thread on 3DPB.com

madeinspace5

Wasp's 3D printers produce low-cost houses made from mud

A need to address a lack of housing for the globe’s growing population has turned up some eye-catching efforts, blending creative architecture with new, sustainable technologies. And it is increasingly looking like 3D printing could have a role to play. Italian firm Wasp is the latest to explore the potential of additive manufacturing in this area, developing a super-sized 3D printer capable of producing low-cost housing made from mud.

Mud brick homes aren’t new, and have a certain appeal for the environmentally conscious due to their low carbon footprint and sustainable nature. Wasp is looking to bring these benefits to a bigger stage by providing a means to quickly create shelter in developing regions where traditional forms of construction might not be possible.

The company’s mud-extruding dream builder stands around 20 ft tall (6 m) and is capable of printing structures 10 ft (3 m) in height. This puts it at around the same size as the printer used by a Chinese company earlier this year to construct 10 houses in less than 24 hours.

The idea behind Wasp’s approach is the housing can be built on location, using materials found on site at zero cost. The printer can reportedly be built by two people in as little as two hours using materials ranging from mud to clay and other natural fibers. The company demonstrated the printer earlier this month at Rome’s Maker Faire. While not a full scale model, at 4 m (13 ft) it was able to produce smaller versions of its mud brick dwellings and serve as a proof-of-concept.

“We will print a mixture made of clay and sand,” CEO Massimo Moretti said leading up to the event. “It takes weeks to print a real house, so we will print a smaller building because we only have two days. But the print, the mixture and materials have been already tested and they’re working.”

The design for these structures is inspired by the mud dauber wasp, which build their nests using mud. As it turns out, the company’s name doubles as an acronym for “World’s Advanced Saving Project.”

While it has exhibited the potential of its approach, Wasp is yet to detail exactly when it plans to begin deploying its 3D printers.

Source: Wasp

Original Made in USA – J Head Hot End Kit 0.35 mm Nozzle 1.75 mm Filament – Resistor, Thermistor, Teflon Tubing – Jhead Hotend 3D Printer

The Jhead hotends are the original, made in USA by the inventor. This kit contains (1) Hot end with a 0.35 mm nozzle to use with 1.75 filament (PLA or ABS) (2) Resistor (3) Thermistor (4) PTFE Teflon Tubing for the resistor and thermistor.

Product Features

  • Original, made by the inventor, not made in China
  • Lightweight. Prints fast. Heats up fast. Accurate temperature reporting. Prints reliably with both ABS and PLA. (PLA may require a small fan to provide air-flow through the cooling vents which are milled in the sides of the nozzle holder.)
  • Easily interfaces with the most popular RepRap extruders, such as Wade’s Extuder and Greg Frost’s Hinged Accessible Extruder.
  • Simple design. Number of custom machined parts is kept to a minimum.
  • Resistor is used as a heater. No need to wrap nichrome wire or to bake a heater core. Heat transmission is improved because there is no thermal junction where a separate heater would screw onto the nozzle.

Detailed Information available on our Homepage…