Company Offers Custom 3D-Printed Life-Sized Head Urns

Jeff and Stacy Staab, owners of Arlington, Vermont-based Cremation Solutions, offer a product for storing the remains of loved ones unlike anything you’ve ever seen: fully customizable, 3D-printed, life-sized head urns that look exactly like the recently deceased.

“With personal urns, you can have a lifelike bust of your loved one that doubles as an urn for the ashes,” the company website says. “For people with longer hair we will use a wig to match. Shorter hair can be made as part of the urn itself… They are the perfect way to secure and store the ashes of any loved one.”

“Personalization has been a big trend in the industry,” Jeff Staab told Breitbart News. “When I saw this technology, I thought, ‘What could be more personal than a full-sized head that holds the remains of your loved ones?”

Staab has operated Cremation Solutions for the past ten years. Before his work creating memorials for loved ones, he served as a funeral director for two decades.

For the personalized urns, Staab explained that the company collects a few digital images of the deceased from the bereaved, and then uses software to turn the images into a 3D model. The company then sends the designs to the family for approval, and begins 3D-printing the bust. Staab said orders are usually completed within two weeks.

In addition to the personalized urns, the company offers life-sized busts of several different famous figures, like Superman, Robot Man, and Indiana Jones, with the heads doubling as urns. Staab recalled that his supplier once sent him the wrong order.

“I got President Obama as a sample, and that was a mistake,” Staab said. “I was supposed to get [George] Clooney. So I get some hate mail about that, that I have a sitting president as an urn. I’m not political at all, so I hope it’s not an insult.”

Despite the company’s accuracy in producing the life-like urns, Staab conceded that they have startled people in the past.

“They look a little too real, so sometimes they creep people out,” he said. “They just freak people out a little bit.”

Staab became excited when discussing his latest product for scattering ashes, the Loved One Launcher, billed on the company website as “the only device of its kind that will shoot earthly remains over seventy feet into the air!”

“We fill it with confetti and streamers, it’s really cool,” Staab said. “I think I’ll sell a lot of them. People are always looking for new and creative ways to scatter ashes. Talk about ‘out with a bang.’”

“I was on Joan Rivers’ show a little while ago, and she told me she wanted a Loved One Launcher. Said it right in the camera. And now she’s gone. That would make my day if I get to go and scatter Joan Rivers’ ashes. I’m still waiting for the call.”

ShapeIt Offers 3D Printed Video Game Characters Via Kickstarter Campaign

If video games are your thing, there are probably some games you spend more time with than others. If your game allows it, you probably customize the characters and make them match your vision. If you’ve ever wished R5WefnWyou could have a real-life version of your character, stop wishing because ShapeIt wants to make your dream come true. ShapeIt is a small software and 3D design company based in the Pacific Northwest. It wants to make things easier for gamers everywhere through the magic of 3D printing.

ShapeIt is looking for $50,000 CAD to get things moving.To do this, they have turned to creating a  Kickstarter campaign. The funds will be uses to develop an API, so that game developers will be able to integrate ShapeIt’s technology into their games to allow players to create and 3D print characters from the comfort of their console. If you’re not into video games, ShapeIt will 3D print any picture you send them—selfies, sketches–you name it. According to the project’s developers the idea behind this project is simple:

“About a year ago, we started our business and came up with an idea that seemed brutally simple: bring the power of 3D printing to the gaming world. We wanted to st7Rsmabuild technology that would allow a gaming enthusiast like you to transform their virtual character or other in-game item that they’d worked so hard to nurture, develop, and fall in love with into reality. A real 3D printed figurine in full color and incredible fine detail.”

If you want ShapeIt to 3D print a character for you, first you’ll have to visit the company’s Kickstarter campaign page. Then, you’ll need to send the team at ShapeIt an image of what you want your character to look like. Then they’ll create a 3D model of your image, print it and send it your way.

ShapeIt’s custom figurines come in three sizes: 4 inches (10cm large), 2.75 inches (7cm medium), and 1.5 inches (4cm small). The larger figures are made of gypsum, while the smaller ones are made of high-quality plastic. A small figurine from a 2D game, painted white, will cost you $39. For $154, you can get a four-inch full-color model from a 3D game. Finally, $199 will buy you a small, medium, and large model of your character from a 3D game.

Learn more about Shapeit its campaign to 3D Print Your Custom Game Characters here. Are you a backer of ShapeIt?  Let us know in the ShapeIt forum thread on 3DPB.com. Check out the Kickstarter campaign video pitch below.

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Tinkerine U Offers Educational 3D Printing Programs for Schools

DittoPro_FrontTinkerine is Canada’s premier 3D printing company for the development, production, and distribution of printers, software, and supplies in both the education and consumer markets. As part of their company’s educational outreach, they have announced an initiative designed to bring 3D printing curriculum to every school. They are calling their program: Tinkerine U.

The newly appointed Managing Director of Tinkerine U explained:

“We know that 3D printing in the classroom is the centerpiece to a comprehensive active learning approach, where students learn the problem solving skills to become the leaders of the future. As a company, Tinkerine remains committed to making 3D printing affordable and accessible to schools, teachers, and students anywhere in the world. Now, with Tinkerine U, we can ensure that these powerful technologies are also actually useful in every classroom and don’t just gather dust.”

As such, the U will offer online courses in 3D printing, lesson plans developed by educators, an extensive library of educational models, and extra-curricular 3D content. They are inviting schools to become educational partners and as incentive are offering an ‘Educational Package’ that includes a choice of 3D printer, as well as free access to course content and the education library.

Screen Shot 2014-07-03 at 8.12.34 PMCourse listings for this fall include Introduction to 3D Printing part I, made up of a four part sequence designed to familiarize students with 3D printing technologies, preparing them “to participate in the 3D printing revolution and partake in the emerging economy of contribution.”

As have so many other 3D printing companies, Tinkerine has recognized the benefits of creating a class of 3D literate graduates. These are the future consumers of their technologies, and the group that will drive continued demand and new innovation within the field. They offer their own self-designed 3D printer, printer parts, laser cutting services, and Fused Filament Fabrication prototyping services. As 3D printing becomes a part of the way in which people interact with the world around them, their potential market grows and they prepare their future employees/partners.

Screen Shot 2014-07-03 at 8.12.14 PMRecognizing that the success of Tinkerine U relies on the classroom teachers implementing the curriculum, they have been careful to provide resources and assistance designed to make the integration of their technologies into the classroom as simple as possible. They have developed this suite of educational programs in cooperation with their partner Ready Labs, Inc., a content provider specializing in technology. The curriculum is first available in certain school districts in the United States and across Canada. There are long term plans to globalize the educational program as well.

Tinkerine’s partner, Ready Labs was co-founded with Simon Fraser University (SFU) which has over a decade’s worth of experience in the creation of interactive educational content. Dr. Mario Pinto, Vice President of Research at SFU stated that:

“Ready Lab’s collaboration with Tinerkine in this educational initiative reflects Simon Fraser University’s mission of ‘Engaging Students, Engaging Research, and Engaging Communities’ through cutting edge technology and research.”

It will be interesting to see whether initiatives such as this one survive beyond this first generation of user development, as competencies with these technologies become a more routine part of every person’s skills. This is most likely a reasonably short-term investment with long term benefits for everyone involved, and is an educational model where the benefits of public/private partnerships can lead to benefits for all.  Discuss this great program in the Tinkerine U forum thread at 3DPB.com.

Nylon 3D Printing Material Offers High Break Resistance

New Product From: 7/4/2014 Modern Machine Shop, Edited by Jedd Cole ,

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Stratasys offers FDM Nylon 12, a nylon material engineered for use with the company’s Fortus line of 3D printing systems. The nylon uses fused deposition modeling for tough and flexible unfilled parts with as much as five times greater breaking resistance and improved impact strength. The elongation-at-break specification is said to surpass that of other 3D printed nylon 12 material by as much as 100 percent. This strength creates opportunities for manufacturers in aerospace, automotive, home appliance and consumer electronics to fashion durable parts that can withstand high vibration, repetitive stress and fatigue. The company says its material suits end-use parts such as interior panels, covers, environmental ducting and vibration-resistant components, as well as tools, manufacturing aids and jigs. The material features high fatigue endurance, strong chemical resistance and high impact strength for repetitive snap- or press-fits. The black material is available for the Fortus 360, 400 and 900 systems.