Momspresent Baby Hands & Feet 3d Printing Kits Deluxe – Diy (white)

Our luxury kits come with everything you need to make a wonderful model of your child’s hands and feet.
This includes soft clay for the molds (four pouches), plaster, mixing bowl and stirrer, cleaning brush, gold paint, paintbrush, three keepsake jars (for a lock of hair, say…), a mini-frame for a picture of Baby, Adhesive Pads and of course a beautiful presentation frame.
The frames are 16.14 x 8.26 x 1.96 inch (4 x 21 x 5 cm), and are finished in Simple White, Persian Walnut, Shining Silver or Special Gold effects, and can be hung in landscape or portrait fashion. There are also four colorful background illustrations to choose from.
Don’t worry if you make a mistake – there is enough plaster for two sets of hands and feet. In fact, you

Price:$99.00

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Ideazoo 3D printing bringing efficiency to everyone

Ideazoo 3D printingIdeazoo 3D printing
 Each and every day science is making huge strides forward in all types of areas. 3D printing is a process we hear about often and is growing bigger all the time. In Lafayette, one business has grown so much, it grew right out of the CEO’s home.  

Ideazoo’s plan was to turn ideas into realities. They take those ideas, put them on paper, scan them into a computer, and before you know it they are turned into real products using a 3D printer. 

“We’ve printed thousands of pieces so far,” CEO of Ideazoo Jacques Dugal said. 

Now up to nine 3D printers and a laser cutting machine, the products they create from different materials really have almost no limits. 

“An interior designer wanted a very specific type of handle for a home. So, we designed and made drawer pulls and cabinet knobs for the entire house,” Dugal said. 

They even have plants to take their products to the sea for recreational use. 

“One of our designers likes to surf and ride boards, so we’ll make one for him,” he said. 

The process of 3D printing creates efficiency. According to Ideazoo designer Chad Weaver, a months long process of tooling, all the way to making a mold piece costs thousands of dollars. 

“This allows me in 4 hours to design a joint, print it out, have a piece in hand, test it, structural everything. Go back edit it change it and go back and print a whole new part all within the same day for pennies on the dollar. It really allows rapid development of products and prototyping,” Weaver said. 

Reduce and Reuse: ExtrusionBot’s ‘Cruncher’ Recycles and Pelletizes 3D Printing Filament Waste

ExtrusionLogo-No-Background-2-e1401751671578ExtrusionBot is in the business of supplying 3D printing enthusiasts with materials. Breaking into the 3D printing industry with their specialized ExtrusionBot filament extruder that can be used with any desktop 3D printer, the new — and highly popular — company is keeping forward momentum with innovations for user filament production, and always leaving a smaller footprint.

ExtrusionBot began their journey with a stunning campaign on Kickstarter to reach a goal of $10K for their filament maker but, with huge success, ended with nearly $90K in funding. Now, they’ve launched a new filament product for recycling, the Cruncher, that works side-by-side with ExtrusionBot materials or as a standalone device, and has just been launched on Kickstarter with a goal of $20K — and good progress so far.

Self-contained and homebuilt, the ExtrusionBot itself touts a good long list of benefits to include speed andgif built-in spooling. The primary and most important feature with the ExtrusionBot though is the affordability it lends to the 3D printing enthusiast, who may have gotten past the initial expense and output for the 3D printer itself, but is finding the ongoing filament expense to be a drain — and a drag.

Using ABS or PLA pellets, affordable spools of filament are produced with automatic spooling so that you don’t have to pick up and spool a big mess of filament from the workshop floor later; however, what do you do with all that excess filament? We spend a lot of time discussing speed and affordability, but very little time discussing waste. What do you do with all your filament waste? Is it piling up in the trash or the recycling bin? Have you got it stashed in a corner of your work area, with big plans to use it for a concept that you are still waiting to come to you?

ExtrusionBot is bringing you a way to deal with filament waste now — and to add right back into your bottom line. If you love to come full circle with recycling like so many of us do, this means you are never creating waste.

Enter the Cruncher, which helps you not only with driving down your material costs but also expands your world creatively as you can afford to come up with more design ideas and do the 3D printing, both mastering the technology and coming up with the next amazing invention the world is waiting for. Next time you have a failed print or something that doesn’t come out the way you like, wasting material is not an issue — and now you know what to do with old prototypes sitting around uselessly, gathering dust balls.

the other guysThe fully-motorized Cruncher literally eats up the waste and spits it back out in even smaller pellets than were used originally for making the filament. It can also be used separately, and crunches all materials. Referred to as a ‘pelletizer,’ the recycled filament is reduced to a uniform, fine mass of pellets that make even higher quality 3D prints.

The ExtrusionBot team has been working on the Cruncher for a year now. Functioning prototypes are completed, and with the funds they will perform a slight bit of “fine tuning in the tooling process,” and then begin pumping out the orders for their supporters right away.

With the funds from Kickstarter, the ExtrusionBot and Cruncher team also plan to develop an even larger crunching capacity — from 2″ x 3” to 4″ x 6” — and develop a built-in plunger to go with the machine. Those who pledge at the $50 mark receive 10 pounds of pellets and 5 color packs. As the amount ascends to the $455 range, the Kickstarter supporters receive the machine itself in an early bird special, with packages becoming more inclusive as pledges increase.cycle

And yes, you can basically ‘crunch’ anything you want — including all those plastic water bottles. Whether you are 3D printing or not, crunching unnecessary items looks not only fun but cathartic. What a great way to relax, recycle, save money, and save the planet.

Are you currently recycling your filament? Are you planning to support the Cruncher Kickstarter campaign? Discuss in the ExtrusionBot’s ‘Cruncher‘ Forum over at 3DPB.com. Check out the Cruncher’s Kickstarter video below to see it in action:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfLnxqMqNt8]EB2MODULES-738x650

DKSH to Distribute EnvisionTEC 3D Printing Solutions Throughout Asia

envisiontec-logoToday comes an announcement from Zurich regarding a dynamic new agreement and partnership between two European companies with their sights set on lighting Asia up with their 3D printing solutions — not only across the world — but across a wide variety of sectors.

Shaking hands on the new deal are Germany’s EnvisionTech (also with headquarters in Missouri) and DKSH Business Unit Technology.

DKSH has agreed to provide EnvisionTEC with marketing, sales, and support in:

  • Malaysia
  • The Philippines
  • Singapore
  • Taiwan
  • Vietnam

This is a highly strategic partnership for the two companies as DKSH is firmly in the door in the Asian market, and will be able to create a substantial amount of new business for EnvisionTEC, provider of professional grade 3D printers, software, and 3D printing materials. EnvisionTEC provides a variety of specialty 3D printing solutions to industries in the following sectors:

  • Designdk
  • Industry
  • Dental
  • Orthodontic
  • Medical devices
  • Micro- and bio-technology

“It is a privilege for us to partner with a highly innovative company like EnvisionTEC. Thanks to our unmatched Asian footprint, we can leverage our size, experience and industry know-how to provide tailored services and exceptional distribution opportunities for EnvisionTEC,” commented Hanno Elbraechter, Head Business Unit Technology, DKSH.

Holding more than 90 international patents, EnvisionTEC’s 3D printing solutions are meant to be installed in laboratories or clinics, and are used by designers and manufacturers of hearing aids and industrial goods, as well as jewelry companies. Their 3D printing tools are based on quality, speed, and high resolution.

EnvisionTEC_ProductsEnvisionTEC offers numerous different models and types of 3D printers based on client needs, grouped in multiple families from the Ultra 3SP Family to the Perfactory Family to the Large Frame Industrial 3SP – all made to create a variety of precise, detailed 3D prints depending on output and products required. They also supply a long list of materials in different categories from 3SP to Perfactory to Micro Materials.

“DKSH is going to be a strong partner to expand our distribution channels in Asia. This agreement represents an opportunity for mutual growth and we look forward to working with DKSH to broaden our market share in their region,” said Sobhi Aris, Vice President of Asia Sales and New Market Development, EnvisionTEC.

DKSH is in the business of helping other large companies break into new geographies and  international markets. No small operation, they maintain 735 business locations in 35 countries, and 710 of them are in Asia, much to EnvisionTEC’s benefit in this partnership to spread their 3D printing products to the area.

Discuss the implications of this new partnership entering the 3D printing market in Asia in the DKSH to Distribute EnvisionTEC 3D Printing Solutions forum over at 3DPB.com.DKSH Technology is a leading supplier of 3D printing solutions worldwide