Just in Time for the SuperBowl: Stratasys Shows Off Their Stuff with New 3D Printed Football

StratasysLogoWithTagline_CMYKIt’s that time of the year again, and one has to consider which has become bigger—the SuperBowl—or the amazing marketing surrounding it? For sure, we get a big dose of football, but also an opportunity to learn about a lot of big new products that are arriving on the scene. And as everyone gets in on the frenzy of the biggest game of the year, Stratasys was not to be topped, producing a multi-material 3D printed football.

Objet500 Connex3 Coloro Multi-material 3D Printer

Objet500 Connex3 Coloro Multi-material 3D Printer

As the Patriots meet the SeaHawks on the field, TVs will be running overtime all over the country and world, with the crowds hoisting beers and raising arms in cheering as their teams score and hopefully, triumph. By next year though, there just may be a team of kids out on the lawn playing ball, and tossing around their very own 3D printed footballs, courtesy of Stratasys. And while I don’t think their marketing video is hitting the leagues of the SuperBowl (not this year, anyway), it’s important, and interesting, to get a look at what is most likely the world’s first 3D printed football.

Manufactured on an Objet500 Connex3 3D printer, Stratasys gave their multi-material machine a good chance to show off its stuff, using three different materials, with the rubber-like TangoPlus, VeroMagenta, and VeroYellow—all for the one football. With the incredible versatility and choices of material available with the Objet500 Connex3, Stratasys was able to use textures and materials so that their 3D printed football feels and looks almost identical to the traditional pigskin.

super-bowl-3d-printed-footballUsing triple jet technology, the Objet500 Connex3 3D printer is receiving more and more acclaim due to its ability to print large parts or multiple parts all in one job, as well as integrating multiple materials. It has amazing color capabilities and can create three-component digital materials, with over 1000 materials and resins to choose from. Fine details and smooth surfaces are promised, and the 3D printed football is a nice example of what it can do not just as a novelty item for the SuperBowl, but as another 3D printed item they can offer to the sports world.

Stratasys has already worked with a multitude of sports enthusiasts, teams, and companies, and we’ve followed along, writing a number of stories on their successes and interesting projects regarding 3D printing in areas like kite surfing where they were able to help university students 3D print custom parts to help them in an extreme challenge involving the elements of wind and sea.

Being able to use 3D printing in sports is one more area where access to streamlined design and customization mean that athletes and athletics companies can bring new and exciting products to the industry and marketplace faster, and with more input from the individuals actually using the products likes skis, motocross bicycles, or fencing equipment—all items which Stratasys has worked in developing different pieces for with the technology of 3D printing.

Have you seen any 3D printed items for sports? What do you think or the impact 3D printing can have in the sports arena? Tell us your thoughts in the Stratasys 3D Printed Football forum over at 3DPB.com, and what the heck, let us know who you are cheering for in this year’s Super Bowl.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUBceawRioQ]

SUMMARY: Stratasys is in the spirit of the New Year and the height of football season, as the SuperBowl looms, and fans are getting excited. With the Objet500 Connex3, Stratasys is showing what the multi-material 3D printer is capable of with the use of three different materials– TangoPlus, VeroMagenta, and VeroYellow. This is not Stratasys’ first foray into the world of sports, as they have also 3D printed parts for kiteboards, bikes, skis, and have even made 3D printed fencing equipment.  Additional information on this awesome 3D printed football can be found here:  http://3dprint.com/40326/superbowl-3d-print-football/

Below is a picture of the ball:

http://3dprint.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/super-bowl-3d-printed-football.jpg

3D printer maker Stratasys cuts profit forecast after GrabCAD deal

Reuters

Nov 5 (Reuters) – 3D printer maker Stratasys Ltd
cut its profit forecast for 2014, citing its recent acquisition
of computer-aided design systems developer GrabCAD and ongoing
development costs.

Stratasys’s shares were down 7.7 percent in premarket
trading on Wednesday as investors shrugged off the company’s
better-than-expected third-quarter revenue and profit.

Stratasys completed its purchase of GrabCAD on Sept. 23. The
financial details of the deal were not disclosed.

The company reaffirmed its full-year revenue forecast of
$750 million to $770 million, but cut its profit forecast to
$2.21-$2.31 per share from $2.25-$2.35.

Analysts on average expect a profit of $2.30 per share on
revenue of $759 million, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.

Stratasys reaffirmed its revenue guidance of $750 million to
$770 million.

The company reported a 62 percent jump in revenue for the
third quarter ended Sept. 30, helped by strong demand for its
MakerBot-branded consumer products and services.

Revenue from MakerBot increased by more than 80 percent
compared with the same quarter of 2013.

Stratasys, which has traditionally sold industrial printers
for $15,000-$750,000, bought MakerBot last year to offer
printers starting at just over $1,000.

Industries use 3D printing to make prototypes and
specialized tools, moldings and some end-use parts, but there is
growing demand for home 3D printers that can churn out simple
products.

Stratasys said last week it holds about 55 percent of the
market for printers priced over $10,000. It said it has about 35
percent of the market for desktop printers sold for under
$10,000, largely through its MakerBot branded printers.

Stratasys executives, citing industry research, have said
the global 3D-printing market is expected to swell to $21
billion by 2020 from $3 billion last year.

Hewlett-Packard Co said last week it had developed
3D-printing technology that can print 10 times faster and at
considerably less expense than current products, and that it
plans to launch the technology broadly in 2016.

The news sent Stratasys’s shares down 3 percent.

The net loss attributable to Stratasys widened to $31.3
million, or 62 cents per share, in the quarter ended Sept. 30,
from $6.6 million, or 16 cents per share, a year earlier.

Net sales rose to $203.6 million from $125.6 million.

Stratasys shares were trading at $111.89 premarket, down
from their Tuesday close of $121.25. Up to Tuesday’s close, the
stock had fallen about 10 percent this year.

(Reporting By Arathy S Nair and Anya George Tharakan in
Bangalore; Editing by Ted Kerr)

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Stratasys 3D Printing Technology Helps Top Special Effects Company Secure Leading Rolein …

MINNEAPOLIS and REHOVOT, Israel, October 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ —

3D printing revolutionizes production of costumes and props for FBFX Ltd, thanks to high quality, precision detail and fast-turnaround times  

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS), a global leader of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions, today announced that its Objet Connex technology has played a starring role in one of this year’s biggest movie blockbusters, through its continued use by leading movie costumes and props specialists, FBFX Ltd.

     (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141029/713468-a )
     (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141029/713468-b )
     (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20141029/713468-c )

FBFX Ltd was part of the team behind the off-beat science fiction adventure movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, a role which saw it create various 3D printed pieces including the entire ‘armor’ outfit for the character, Korath, played by Djimon Hounsou. According to Grant Pearmain, director of costume and props at FBFX, this was produced almost entirely using Stratasys’ Objet500 Connex technology and represents the first time the company has produced a fully 3D printed costume worn in a movie.

The same Objet500 Connex technology was employed to produce the memorable Star Lord helmet worn by lead-actor, Chris Pratt. Several prototype versions were 3D printed, as well as vacuum-cast versions created from a 3D printed mold. The actual prop worn in the movie featured 3D printed interior and exterior detailing using Stratasys’ VeroGray material.

Scene-stealing benefits 

According to Pearmain, 3D printing technology has moved things to a new dimension for his company, specifically in quality and turnaround times in comparison to traditional methods involving model makers working with clay. Underscoring the rapid advance of digital technology within FBFX’s operations, the company now utilizes 3D printing in 90% it’s projects – a leap from a mere 10% around only three or four years ago.

“Quite simply, Stratasys’ PolyJet technology delivers a level of quality with precise detail that is better than anything else available. We no longer have to contend with repeatability issues like variations in skill level from one craftsman to another – we know exactly what the 3D printed piece will look like, regardless of how many pieces we’re producing,” he explains.

Workflow times slashed by half 

“All told, we’re saving at least 50% on lead times, a precious commodity when working on a film, as there’s never enough time. This faith in the 3D printed piece and the speed at which we can have it in our hands, also gives us the flexibility and confidence to regularly experiment and to try new things – something we’ve not always had the time to do,” he continues.

These time savings have allowed Pearmain and his team to go from design to virtually completed, accurate prototypes in a few days, as opposed to a few weeks. FBFX can now show highly-detailed pieces to production companies much more quickly than using traditional methods, while also rapidly turning around pieces in response to directors’ sudden demands for camera tests.

Seamless transatlantic workflow and collaboration  

For Pearmain, the capability of 3D printing to allow different teams in different countries to work on the same project, further demonstrates its process-enhancing benefits: “We will often receive digital files from concept designers in Los Angeles that we finalize and 3D print via our service bureau IPF, with whom we’ve collaborated on a number of major motion pictures,” he explains. “Similarly, we might send concept files to the team there to tweak and return for outputting here, so it’s all about a fast, seamless operation that again helps us save time.”

Simon Brandon, UK Marketing Manager at Stratasys, believes that from a technological aspect, deploying 3D printing within this particular field of use offers a number of new benefits previously beyond the reach of companies like FBFX.

“The high quality and precision detail achievable from our 16 micron layer PolyJet-based 3D printers ensures fully-functional props with unprecedented realism, which together with the printers’ high print speeds, fulfill two of the foremost prerequisites demanded by companies like FBFX,” he concludes.

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq: SSYS), headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Rehovot, Israel, is a leading global provider of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions. The company’s patented FDM®, PolyJet™, and WDM™ 3D Printing technologies produce prototypes and manufactured goods directly from 3D CAD files or other 3D content. Systems include 3D printers for idea development, prototyping and direct digital manufacturing. Stratasys subsidiaries include MakerBot and Solidscape, and the company operates a digital-manufacturing service, comprising RedEye, Harvest Technologies and Solid Concepts. Stratasys has more than 2500 employees, holds over 600 granted or pending additive manufacturing patents globally, and has received more than 25 awards for its technology and leadership. Online at: http://www.stratasys.com or http://blog.stratasys.com

Stratasys Media Contacts
USA
Aaron Masterson
Weber Shandwick
Tel. +1-952-346-6258
AMasterson@webershandwick.com
     
Asia Pacific
Stratasys AP
Janice Lai /  Frances Chiu
Tel. +852-3944-8818
Janice.lai@stratasys.com
Frances.Chiu@stratasys.com  

Brazil
Tatiana Fonseca
GAD Communications
Tel: +55-11-3846-9981
tatiana@gadcom.com.br

Europe
Jonathan Wake / Miguel Afonso
UK Bespoke
Tel: +44-1737-215200
stratasys@bespoke.co.uk

Japan
Stratasys Japan
Aya Yoshizawa
Tel. +81-90-6473-1812
Aya.yoshizawa@stratasys.com

Mexico
Stratasys Mexico
Thibault Leroy
Tel. +52 1 (55) 4866-0800
thibault.leroy@stratasys.com

Stratasys
Arita Mattsoff / Joe Hiemenz
Stratasys
Tel. +972(0)74-745-4000 (IL)
Tel. +1-952-906-2726 (US)
arita@stratasys.com
joe.hiemenz@stratasys.com   

Korea
Stratasys Korea
Jihyun Lee
Tel. +82-2-2046-2287
jihyun.lee@Stratasys.com

SOURCE Stratasys Ltd.