Guillemin Takes His 'Secret Life of Heroes' 3D Printed Cult Art To Book Form, Launches Kickstarter …

artist

The artist

Greg “Léon” Guillemin has dreamt up one of those rare and funny, delightful concepts that combined with stunning craftsmanship simply leaves everyone wanting more. He’s also an artist who enjoys working in a variety of mediums which is even more thrilling for the viewer, as we have the opportunity to check out everything from 3D printed sculpture to paintings, prints, and books.

bookWhile it’s said that everyone has a bit of the voyeur in them, who could resist the idea of seeing what superheroes do in their off time—in full, widespread color? Leaving you shaking your head in wonder at the creativity, Guillemin offers a journey through the secret lives of superheroes. It might not be your grandmother’s humor, as we check out protectors of the world and beyond, picking their noses and dealing with malodorous armpit stains, but it has an obvious appeal to the twisted sense of humor this generation enjoys so heartily.

Numerous characters are depicted in 3D printed sculptures featured in his new Kickstarter campaign meant to secure funding for publishing his art books, beginning with For Your Eyes Only, which is a celebration of the second anniversary of his ‘Secret Life of Heroes’ series of paintings. Hoping to raise 30K, the Kickstarter campaign runs through March 5, 2015. Guillemin stresses that the funds are needed to publish the first edition of the book, which he envisions as a big, lush art book full of the vibrancy of his paintings and works, scaled at about the size of an LP cover.

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Already a successful and fulfilled artist, Guillemin simply began having fun with ‘Secret Life of Heroes’ which has–not surprisingly–developed a cult following which he refers to as a ‘geek art’ series, depicting super heroes in a number of different poses and activities, which (ahem!) they may not have approved of if they had a choice.

As the artwork gained steam, Guillemin also worked with the Nyce Gallery to collaborate on 3D printed sculptures. As the fan base for ‘Secret Life of Heroes’ grew, Guillemin began toying with the idea of a book series, and began putting his favorite images into a compilation, while in the process of creating a previous exhibition.secret life

Guillemin went on to unveil his ‘Pop Icons’ series, creating even more complex characters and subjects, taking the humor—and artwork—to the next level. It’s going to be interesting to see how the book series continues to evolve, along with other mediums in the future.

Those who pledge even at the lowest levels will receive copies of For Your Eyes. As pledges increase, supporters receive signed books, hand-signed posters, canvas prints, and more. As they pledge upward of $2500 supporters will begin to receive Guillemin’s 3D printed sculptures. And for a really cool once-in-a-lifetime experience, if you pledge $9900, you receive a 3D printed sculpture, an original signed book, and dinner out with the artist—as well as a private viewing of his work.

It’s easy to see why Guillemin’s latest work has a variety of venues falling over themselves, clamoring to show off his art—including an up and coming solo showing of his work in Paris at Galerie Lacroix on February 6th.

Are you thinking about contributing to this Kickstarter campaign? What do you think of Guillemin’s use of 3D printing to convey his artwork? Tell us your thoughts in the ‘Secret Life of Heroes’ forum over at 3DPB.com.

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‘Pop Icons’

Octogenarian Craftsman Takes Up 3D Design for Holiday Gift of 3D Printed Miniature Furniture Set

sculpteo logoThe story of Jérôme Morin and his creativity is important, delivering impact in multiple ways. This is a gentleman who understands the significance of posterity, of keepsakes, and of holding his family close and dear, presenting them with delightful gifts that are meant to be kept forever.

He is a deeply thoughtful artist and maker whose work encompasses intricate detail, personalization, and significance for those on the very privileged receiving end. What is also significant is his age. At 80, Morin is blazing past the stereotypes that say those outside of the new high-tech generations can’t or won’t pick up some mad new digital skill sets. While I cannot say this is the case with most of the older generations in my family who dismiss the latest technology with a wave of the hand and say “leave that stuff to the younger people,” it’s safe to say we are all duly inspired to see a multi-talented artist and individual of any age who is a role model for everyone — from small children to your great-grandmother.

2014-miniatures-fauteuil-salonFor almost three decades, Morin has been gifting his family with impressive treats that put his design talent on full display. With a passion for design and also for miniatures, Morin is able to make, finish, and build gifts that he can give to younger generations that they can pass on as well. My daughter has a dollhouse that was my mother’s, then my sister’s, then my niece’s, and now belongs to her. It’s filled with amazing pieces of miniature furniture, from a porcelain bathtub and toilet, to handcrafted bunk beds with actual little bedspreads. Not only does my little one have hours of imaginary delight with the dollhouse, but the gift imbues special warmth and a sense of comfort because it is a family heirloom. The pieces end up scattered all around our real house, and we all take special care to put them back where they belong.

Also taking special care not to disappoint, Morin decided this year to gift his grandson with an entire living room — his own. Yes, in miniature. And this time — with 3D printing. Morin already had the basic skills necessary for 3D design, so he knew the general direction he wanted to go in, and what new technology he thought would work, but he needed advice.

“I’m not too bad at using architecture, animation or AutoCAD softwares. But I knew I had to perfectly master 3D modelling skills to get the result I was hoping for, which would take a really long time,” said Morin.

IMG_7891He turned to Sculpteo for a true collaboration in crafting his grandson’s gift. It’s no surprise that someone with such a creative spirit would have a living area decorated with many fine details. To replicate them in miniature was a challenge indeed, but obviously that’s what Morin thrives on with his projects.

“My main concern when I make my miniatures is about fineness and details,” he said. “I had to choose between laser cutting and 3D Printing.”

Because finishing is so important in the making of miniatures, Morin was drawn to the services provided by Sculpteo on numerous levels, especially as he was able to work with one of their designers in turning his concept into exactly the reality he envisioned with 3D printing.

Through pictures and brainstorming, Morin and the designers were able to create the 3D files. The ideas were translated into reality at Sculpteo, where they used polyamid material with SLS – and due to the precision of each round of layering with the nylon powder, both the designers and production crew were able to assist Morin in achieving the delicate details required for each miniature piece of furniture, from basic shapes to parts like narrow chair legs. At Sculpteo, they used the following 3D printers to achieve their goals with the printing of the miniatures:

  • EOS Formiga P100
  • P110
  • P395
  • P730

That’s just an example of Sculpteo doing their job – and doing it well, as a full-service 3D printing marketplace. Whether you are designing and need help with 3D printing, or if you are selling, it’s a world unto itself where you can certainly while away the hours learning, conceptualizing, and even making a living from the hobby or small business you are passionate about. Sculpteo offers educational videos, advice, workshops, and apps.

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“Sculpteo gave me the ideal solution in order to create my miniaturized furniture,” said Morin.

Morin’s gift for his grandson puts a whole new spin on the idea of making your own gift —and while there is a whole world of caring people out there putting genuine thought and effort into their gifts for loved ones, I think it’s safe to say that there are grandchildren few and far between with a grandfather who went to quite these lengths all on his own to give such a magnificent gift – which transcends the holiday, and should last a lifetime and beyond, as it is handed down and enjoyed by future appreciative generations.

Have you had experience creating miniatures with 3D printing? Why did you choose 3D printing, if so? Tell us about it in the 3D Printed Miniature Living Room forum over at 3DPB.com.

3D printed car takes 45 hours to build

Three-dimensional printing has scaled up in a carmaker named Local Motors, which said it has built the world’s first 3D-printed car, the Strati.

Local Motors is an open-source hardware company that made the open source off-road Rally Fighter for the desert terrain of Arizona and street-legal in 50 states. It also created the Racer motorcycle, the Cruiser motorized bicycle, and the popular Verrado Drift Trike.

The design for the 3D-printed car was first submitted in a design challenge that attracted more than 200 entries.
Tech blog Boy Genius Reports cited a report on Scientific American showing Local Motors needed just 45 hours to build the Strati, a two-seater electric car that can go up to 120 miles at up to 40 mph.

BGR said the company plans to sell the vehicle for $18,000 to $30,000 while improving the testing procedure.

Tech site Mashable said the 3D-printed car could allow people to “walk into a car dealership, choose a design — including the number of seats — and have a 3D printed car by the end of the day.”

Local Motors CEO Jay Rogers said that while Tesla made the electric drive train famous, “we’re changing the whole car.”

Mashable said the Strati is printed in carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic.

“It’s fine for a neighborhood jaunt, but is not yet allowed on highways. Rogers said there are plans to test the car extensively before selling it to customers or putting it on the freeway,” it said (http://mashable.com/2014/09/16/first-3d-printed-car/).

“It will be positioned like a car for the masses, or many different cars for the masses,” it quoted Rogers as saying. — ELR, GMA News

Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

Countdown to Medicine X: 3D printing takes shape

3D printed handFrom customizing lab equipment to assisting in surgical planning to developing models of proteins and pathogens, 3D printing is helping to reshape biomedical research and health care. This year, Medicine X (which kicks off one week from today) will explore the transformative force of the technology during a range of panels and demonstrations in the “3D Printing and the Future of Medicine” session.

During the session, attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about health-care related 3-D printing applications at the “3-D Experience Zone,” which will showcase technologies from leading manufacturers. Attendees can learn about surgical applications of 3D printing from 3D Systems; find out how 3D Hubs is creating a global community by connecting owners of 3D printers with those who want to utilize the technology; and see how Occipital’s 3D scanning hardware for the iPad is supporting patient care. Additionally, they can discover how Artec creates a 3D full-body scan in a mere 12 seconds and enjoy chocolate and candy from the ChefJet food printer.

The session will also feature two Saturday-afternoon panels titled “Diverse Distributed & Design-Driven” and “Innovation Implementation,” with the latter exploring:

…some of the challenges and issues to consider in this brave new world. Will the FDA approve printed food, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices? How can 3D printing startups include patients in their design process? What are the public health implications when almost anyone can print biomaterials from the comfort of their own home? And once we ensure public safety, how can we make 3D printing affordable and accessible for all?

Darrell Hurt, PhD, computational biologist and project lead for the National Institutes of Health 3D Print Exchange, is among the panelists, and Monika Wittig, director and co-founder of Live Architecture Network, will moderate the discussions.

“As a designer, I am thrilled that this conference continues to widen the view of valuable cross-disciplinary collaborations. This is decidedly the aspect that I found most profound during my first Medicine X experience,” said Wittig. “My hope is attendees leave this session feeling a heightened awareness of 3D design and production technologies and the many realms of potential engagement in health sectors including prototyping, globally-distributed production and mass-customized design.”

More news about Stanford Medicine X is available in the Medicine X category.

Previously: Countdown to Medicine X: Specially designed apps to enhance attendees’ conference experience, Countdown to Medicine X: Global Access Program provides free webcast of plenary proceedings, Countdown to Medicine X: How to engage with the “no smartphone” patient and Medicine X symposium focuses on how patients, providers and entrepreneurs can ignite innovation
Image of 3D printed hand from Medicine X